DSM-III

Diagnostic Criteria

For females

A. Strongly and persistently stated desire to be a boy, or insistence that she is a boy (not merely a desire for any perceived cultural advantages from being a boy).

B. Persistent repudiation of female anatomic structures, as manifested by at least one of the following repeated assertions:

  1. that she will grow up to become a man (not merely in role)
  2. that she is biologically unable to become pregnant
  3. that she will not develop breasts
  4. that she has no vagina
  5. that she has, or will grow, a penis

C. Onset of the disturbance before puberty. (For adults and adolescents, see Atypical Gender Identity Disorder.)

For males

A. Strongly and persistently stated desire to be a girl, or insistence that he is a girl.

B. Either (1) or (2):

  1. persistent repudiation of male anatomic structures, as manifested by at least one of the following repeated assertions:
    • a. that he will grow up to become a woman (not merely in role)
    • that his penis or testes are disgusting or will disappear
    • that it would be better not to have a penis or testes
  2. preoccupation with female stereotypical activities as manifested by a preference for either cross-dressing or simulating female attire, or by a compelling desire to participate in the games and pastimes of girls

C. Onset of the disturbance before puberty. (For adults and adolescents, see Atypical Gender Identity Disorder.)

Differential Diagnosis

Children whose behavior merely does not fit the cultural stereotype of masculinity or femininity should not be given this diagnosis unless the full syndrome is present. Physical abnormalities of the sex organs are rarely associated with Gender Identity Disorder; when they are present, the physical disorder should be noted.

DSM-IV

See Gender Identity Disorder

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