DSM-IV

In DSM-IV, this disorder is called Dementia Due to Multiple Etiologies

For more information, see Dementia

Diagnostic Criteria

A. The development of multiple cognitive deficits manifested by both

  1. memory impairment (impaired ability to learn new information or to recall previously learned information)
  2. one (or more) of the following cognitive disturbances:
    • a. aphasia (language disturbance)
    • b. apraxia (impaired ability to carry out motor activities despite intact motor function)
    • c. agnosia (failure to recognize or identify objects despite intact sensory function)
    • d. disturbance in executive functioning (i.e., planning, organizing, sequencing, abstracting)

B. The cognitive deficits in Criteria A1 and A2 each cause significant impairment in social or occupational functioning and represent a significant decline from a previous level of functioning.

C. There is evidence from the history, physical examination, or laboratory findings that the disturbance has more than one etiology (e.g., head trauma plus chronic alcohol use, Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type with the subsequent development of Vascular Dementia).

D. The deficits do not occur exclusively during the course of a delirium.

Note: Use multiple recordings based on specific dementias and specific etiologies, e.g., Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type, With Late Onset, Uncomplicated; Vascular Dementia, Uncomplicated.

Recording Procedures

Dementia Due to Multiple Etiologies should not be recorded as a diagnosis. For example, both Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type and Vascular Dementia should be diagnosed for an individual with Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type, With Late Onset, Uncomplicated, who, over the course of several strokes, develops a significant further decline in cognitive functioning. In this example, the clinician would list both Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type, With Late Onset, Uncomplicated, Vascular Dementia, Uncomplicated, Alzheimer's Disease, and Stroke.

DSM-5

For more information, see Major and Mild Neurocognitive Disorders

Diagnostic Criteria

A. The criteria are met for major or mild neurocognitive disorder.

B. There is evidence from the history, physical examination, or laboratory findings that the neurocognitive disorder is the pathophysiological consequence of more than one etiological process, excluding substances (e.g., neurocognitive disorder due to Alzheimer's disease with subsequent development of vascular neurocognitive disorder).

C. The cognitive deficits are not better explained by another mental disorder and do not occur exclusively during the course of a delirium.

Note: This category is included to cover the clinical presentation of a neurocognitive disorder (NCD) for which there is evidence that multiple medical conditions have played a probable role in the development of the NCD. In addition to evidence indicative of the presence of multiple medical conditions that are known to cause NCD (i.e., findings from the history and physical examination, and laboratory findings), it may be helpful to refer to the diagnostic criteria for the various medical etiologies (e.g., NCD due to Parkinson's disease) for more information on establishing the etiological connection for that particular medical condition.

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.