DSM-III

In DSM-III, this disorder is called Developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type

Diagnostic Criteria

A. Failure to develop comprehension (decoding) and vocal expression (encoding) of language.

B. Not due to hearing impairment, trauma, Mental Retardation, or Childhood Onset Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

Differential Diagnosis

Developmental Language Disorder, Expressive Type

In Developmental Language Disorder, Expressive Type, the child's comprehension of language is within normal limits for age level, whereas in Developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type, language comprehension is below age level.

Developmental Articulation Disorder

In Developmental Articulation Disorder, both expression and comprehension of language are within normal limits for the child's age level, whereas in Developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type, these are both impaired.

Mental Retardation

In Mental Retardation there is general impairment in intellectual functioning, whereas in Developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type, the child has at least normal nonverbal IQ.

Hearing impairment

In hearing impairment, the child will have a history of responding only to very loud sounds, whereas in Developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type, there may be a history of variable and inconsistent responses to sounds, the child often responding more to environmental sounds than to speech sounds. Abnormal audiometric test results occur in both hearing impairment and in developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type.

Infantile Autism and Childhood Onset Pervasive Developmental Disorder

In Infantile Autism and in Childhood Onset Pervasive Developmental Disorder, no efforts are made to communicate or watch faces, whereas in Developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type, the children will make eye contact and will often try to communicate through gestures. In Infantile Autism, Childhood Onset Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and Developmental Language disorder, Receptive Type, there are short auditory memory spans, auditory discrimination problems, and abnormalities of pitch and intonation.

Acquired aphasia

In acquired aphasia, normal language is followed by a sudden onset of language problems, whereas in Developmental Language Disorder, Receptive Type, there is failure to develop language.

DSM-IV

For more information, see Language Disorder

Diagnostic Criteria

A. The scores obtained from a battery of standardized individually administered measures of both receptive and expressive language development are substantially below those obtained from standardized measures of nonverbal intellectual capacity. Symptoms include those for Expressive Language Disorder as well as difficulty understanding words, sentences, or specific types of words, such as spatial terms.

B. The difficulties with receptive and expressive language significantly interfere with academic or occupational achievement or with social communication.

C. Criteria are not met for a Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

D. If Mental Retardation, a speech-motor or sensory deficit, or environmental deprivation is present, the language difficulties are in excess of those usually associated with these problems.

Note: If a speech-motor or sensory deficit or a neurological condition is present, record the condition.

DSM-5

See 'Language Disorder'

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