DSM-II

For more information, see Schizophrenia

This category is for patients showing signs of schizophrenia but who, following a psychotic schizophrenic episode, are no longer psychotic.

DSM-III

For more information, see Schizophrenia

This category should be used when there has been at least one episode of Schizophrenia but the clinical picture that occasioned the evaluation or admission to clinical care is without prominent psychotic symptoms, though signs of the illness persist. Emotional blunting, social withdrawal, eccentric behavior, illogical thinking and loosening of associations are common. If delusions or hallucinations are present, they are not prominent and are not accompanied by strong affect.

The course of this type is either chronic or subchronic, since "acute exacerbation" by definition, involves prominent psychotic symptoms, and "in remission" implies no signs of the illness.

Diagnostic Criteria

A. A history of at least one previous episode of Schizophrenia with prominent psychotic symptoms.

B. A clinical picture without any prominent psychotic symptoms that occasioned evaluation or admission to clinical care.

C. Continuing evidence of the illness, such as blunted or inappropriate affect, social withdrawal, eccentric behavior, illogical thinking, or loosening of associations.

DSM-IV

For more information, see Schizophrenia

The Residual Type of Schizophrenia should be used when there has been at least one episode of Schizophrenia, but the current clinical picture is without prominent positive psychotic symptoms (e.g., delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech or behavior). There is continuing evidence of the disturbance as indicated by the presence of negative symptoms (e.g., flat affect, poverty of speech, or avolition) or two or more attenuated positive symptoms (e.g., eccentric behavior, mildly disorganized speech, or odd beliefs). If delusions or hallucinations are present, they are not prominent and are not accompanied by strong affect. The course of the Residual Type may be time limited and represent a transition between a full-blown episode and complete remission. However, it may also be continuously present for many years, with or without acute exacerbations.

Diagnostic Criteria

A type of Schizophrenia in which the following criteria are met:

A. Absence of prominent delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, and grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior.

B. There is continuing evidence of the disturbance, as indicated by the presence of negative symptoms or two or more symptoms listed in Criterion A for Schizophrenia, in an attenuated form (e.g., odd beliefs, unusual perceptual experiences).

DSM-5

See Schizophrenia

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