DSM-III

In DSM-III, this category is called Atypical, Mixed, or Other Personality Disorder

If an individual qualifies for any of the specific Personality Disorders, that category should be noted even if some features from other categories are present. For example, an individual who fits the description of Compulsive Personality Disorder should be given that diagnosis even if some mild dependent or paranoid features are present.

When an individual qualifies for two or more Personality Disorders, multiple diagnoses should be made.

  • Atypical Personality Disorder should be used when the clinician judges that a Personality Disorder is present but there is insufficient information to make a more specific designation.
  • Mixed Personality Disorder should be used when the individual has a Personality Disorder that involves features from several of the specific Personality Disorders, but does not meet the criteria for any one Personality Disorder.
  • Other Personality Disorder should be used when the clinician judges that a specific Personality Disorder not included in this classification is appropriate, such as Masochistic, Impulsive, or Immature Personality Disorder. In such instances the clinician should record the specific Other Personality Disorder.

DSM-IV

In DSM-IV, this category is called Personality Disorder Not Otherwise Specified

This category is for disorders of personality functioning that do not meet criteria for any specific Personality Disorder. An example is the presence of features of more than one specific Personality Disorder that do not meet the full criteria for any one Personality Disorder ("mixed personality"), but that together cause clinically significant distress or impairment in one or more important areas of functioning (e.g., social or occupational). This category can also be used when the clinician judges that a specific Personality Disorder that is not included in this Classification is appropriate. Examples include depressive personality disorder and passive-aggressive personality disorder.

 DSM-5

This category applies to presentations in which symptoms characteristic of a personality disorder that cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of clinical functioning predominate but do not meet the full criteria for any of the disorders in the personality disorders diagnostic class. The unspecified personality disorder category is used in situations in which the clinician chooses not to specify the reason that the criteria are not met for a specific personality disorder, and includes presentation in which there is insufficient information to make a more specific diagnosis.

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